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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 January 18, 1937 No. 3 



LATE CABLES 



Czechoslovakia first estimate of area sown to winter 
grains for harvest in 1937 reported as follows, with 1S36 
comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 1,369,000 acres (2,205,000), 
rye 2,447,000 (2,467,000). See table on page 42. (Inter- 
national Institute of Agriculture, Rome, January 12, 1937.) 

France sowings of winter grains to January 1, 1937, esti- 
mated as follows, with comparisons for the corresponding date 
of 1936 in parentheses: Wheat 12,772,000 acres (12,536,000), 
rye 1,620,000 (1,611,000), barley 436,000(452,000), oats 
2,119,000 acres (2,114,000). See table on page 42. (Inter- 
national Institute of Agriculture, Rome, January 13, 1937.) 

Czechoslovakia final estimates of 1936 production 
reported as follows with 1935 comparisons in parentheses: 
Potatoes 393,227,000 bushels (282,094,000), sugar beets 
4,459,000 short tons (4,C26,000), tobacco 37,478,000 pounds 
(27,812,000). See table on page 42. (International In- 
stitute of Agriculture, Rome, January 12, 1937.) 

London wool sales continue with general tone of market 
excellent and rate of prices at opening on January 12 fully 
maintained. Good competition from all Europe for merinos and 
croEsbreds with the United States buying a few long slipes 
and a few best greasy medium crossbreds. (Agricultural 
Attach^ C. C. Taylor, London, January 15, 1937.) 



28 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 3 



Argentina plpjits rocord cotton a;C"reage 



Cotton plantings in Argentina this year have reached the all-time 
record of 1,015,000 acres, according to the first official estimate of the 
Argentine C-overnaent just received from the Buenos Aires office of .the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. This compares vjith tne first estimate 
of 909,000 acres for the 1935-35 crop and the recently revised estimate 
of 763,000 acres for that year. 

Producers "Degan the season with great enthusiasm, hut adverse 
climatic factors, particularly drought, hindered field lahor. Due to 
the persistent drought, the crop in the Giaco Territory, viiere the hulk 
of the crop is grown, is much delayed and plant development is poor. In 
addition, locusts and hail have done considerahle da.mage. In Corrientes, 
the second most importejit producing area, the crop is also poor on account 
of drought and locust damage. Some resowings, made necessary hy locust 
damage, were possiole in the Cliaco Territory and in the Provinces of 
Corrientes and Santiago del Estero. Such resowings, however, have heen 
impossihle or extremely difficult in the other Provinces affected. Be- 
cause of these facts, the Argentine Ministry of Agriculture does not 
expect a hum.per cotton crop this year. 

Last year's cotton crop in Argentina was estimated at the record 
level of 354,000 hales. This made Argentina the eighth most important 
cotton-producing country in the world, having heen exceeded only hy the 
United States, India, China, Russia, Egypt, Brazil, and Peru. The Ar- 
gentine GoverruTient , through the National Cotton Board estahlished ahout 
2 years ago, is making an effort to exp^and cotton production, particularly 
in the Cha_co Territory, where conditions seem to he most favorahle. 

Egyptian cotton ginnings running hig h 

Egyptian cotton ginnings from Septemher 1 to the end of Decemher 
1936 amounted to 1,407,000 hales of 478 pounds net, including scarto 
or linters, as reported hy the International Institute of Agriculture 
at Rome. Dioring the corresponding months of the 1935-36 season^ 1,321,000 
hales were ginned. 

ERUITS, VEGETABLES. AM) NUTS 

Large r supplies of winter vege t ahle s for United States markets 

Larger plantings of winter vegetables in Cuha, Mexico, and Puerto 
Rico indicate that available supplies for the United States market during 
the 1933-37 season will he larger than they were in 1935-56. Shipments 



January 18, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



29 



of vegetables, mainly tomatoes, during the first 3 months of the season, 
October to December, v:ere some-'.That larger than they were in the correspond' 
ing months of 1935. Adverse weather conditions in Cuba and Rierto Rico, 
however, have rediiced yields considerably. VJ'eather conditions in Mexico 
so far have been generally satisfactory. 



LIVESTOCK, mASS, MID TOOL 

G-reat Britai n imxooses import duties on beef 

All beef exports from the United States to Great Britain have been 
made dutiable as a result of the Anglo -Argentine trade agreement signed 
December 1, 1936. The outstanding American items affected are as follows, 
with the former duty in parentheses: Canned beef and veal tongues 20 
percent (10 percent), frozen edible offals 20 percent (free), axid salted 
beef 0.67d. or 1.3 cents per pound (free). The combined average annual 
value of the trade in those 3 items for the years 1930-1934 was nearly 
$2,000,000. These items bulk large in the limited American eirport trade 
in beef, but they are minor items in the Argentine beef trade with Great 
Britain, in which chilled beef predominates and which a.lso has been made 
subject to duty. The new British beef duties became effective December 
16, 1935. 

Chilled beef, formerly admitted into Great Britain duty free, is 
dutiable at 0.75d., or 1.5 cents per pound, under the new agreement. 
The rate on frozen beef, formerly also a-duitted free, and on other types 
not otherwise provided for is 0.67d., or 1.3 cents per jjound. These 
duties are calculated to represent a rate of about 20 percent ad valorem. 
The agreement provides, however, that, if throTjgh advancing prices the 
ad valorem equivalent of the specific rates should fall as low as 17.5 
percent, then the ad valorem duties provided for other types of beef 
would be reduced correspondingly for a period of 6 months. This pro- 
vision would apply to the duties now in effect upon beef imported from 
the United States . 

The quantitative limitations imposed by the agreement on the 
movement of Argentine beef are somewhat unusual in that Argentina agrees 
to limit exports under a licensing system. Annua^l maximum quantities 
h?,ve been established, but the agreement also provides that Argentina 
shall secure a fixed percentage share of any total non-Empire beef 
import allotment Great Britain ma.y see fit to establish. So far, no 
definite system of actual import quotas has been established for beef 
along lines comparable with those applying to pork. The agreement with 
Argentina, however, mentions a British proposal for a conference of all 
countries interested in the British beef market in an effort to agree 
iipon a division of participation between domestic, Empire, and foreign 
producers. It is likely that such a division would entail a system of 
import quotas, at least for non -Empire beef. 



30 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, l]o. 3 



The movement of "both chilled and frozen beef from Argentina to 
G-reat Britain has "been "under control for several years as a result of 
the '^ttarza Agreements of 1932 and the inglo -Argentine Agreement of 1933. 
For Doth types of "beef, British imports for the year ended Jime 30, 1932, 
vrere talcen as a "base figure (see ta"ble "belor;) . For frozen teef, non- 
Empire supplies \7ere to "be so reduced as to represent only 65 percent of 
the base quantity "by January 1, 1934. Actually, exports of frozen "beef 
from Argentina in recent years have "been considera'bly smaller than the 
amount indicated. In chilled "beef, G-reat Britain -undertook to impose no 
limitations vrhich Hould reduce imports dcIott 90 percent of the base figure. 
TThile no specific limitation was imposed on imports from Argentina, ex- 
ports from that country in 1934 and 1935 T7ere little la.rger than the volume 
suggested and pro'ba"bly were smaller than 90 percent of the "base in 1936. 
The nevr Anglo -Argentine Agreement provides for an annual frozen "beef move- 
ment in the years 1937-1939 a'bout the same as that of 1935. In chilled 
"beef, the maximum 1937 movement is to "be a"bout 2 percent smaller than the 
1935 figiore. The 1938 and 1939 allowances are to equal imports of the 
preceding yea.r, less 2 percent of the 1955 figure. 

mriTED KBTG-DOM: Argentine chilled and frozen beef import allotments, 



1937 Tfith comparisons 



Type 


Imports 
in year 

ended 
June 30 

1932 


1934 


1955 


1936 1937 im- 
First 9 monthsports al- 


Ac tual 
imports 


Agree- 
ment 
'ate a/ 


Actua.l 
imports 


Agree- 
ment 
rate a/ 


Ac tual 
imports 


Agree- lowed un- 
ment ider new b/ 
rate a/aereement 


Chilled. . . 
Fr 0 z en . . . . 

Total. . . 


1, 000 
po-cmds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
Tjounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
po"un.d s 


1,000 1 1,000 
pounds': pounds 


860,821 
68, 509 


777,517 
14,657 


774,739 
44,531 


776,967 
13,501 


774,739 
44,531 


592,886 
9,983 


595,156; 761,433 
35,845; 13,955 


929,330 


792,174 


819,270 


790,468 


819,270 


602,869 


631,001: 775,388 



a/ Figures for chilled beef represent minimum imports under terms of Anglo- 
Argentine Agreement of May 1933. Figures for frozen beef represent maxim'om 
imports under terms of Ottawa Agreement of August 1932. b/ The 1937 chilled 
beef allovrance represents a reduction of about 2 percent, or 15,534,000 
pounds, from the 1935 imports. The 1938 and 1939 allowances are to equal 
the imports of the preceding year less 15,534,000 pounds, but the 1939 total 
shall not be less t'nan 738, 080,000 pounds. The annual frozen beef allowance 
is 13,955,000 pounds. 

Australigji and British wool markets continue active 

The wool sales at Brisbane, Australia, opened on January 11 with 
prices unchanged from the relatively high positions established at the 
closing on Jan'oary 7 of the Sydney sales, according to cabled advices 
from the London office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Compe- 
tition at Brisbane was broad and keen, with Japan the chief buyer. Good 
support was offered by continental, American, ajid British buyers. At the 
London sales opening on January 12, prices ranged from 5 to 15 percent 



January 18, 1937 



foreign Crops and Markets 



31 



higher than the closing levels of the series ended December 2. Continental 
"buyers vere particularly active in merinos, with Yorkshire the chief "buyer 
of all types of crossloreds. 

The current strength in Australian and English wool markets is a 
continuation of conditions noted following a "brief easing of prices in mid- 
Decemoer. According to Consul E. E. Eva.ns at Bradford, the short period 
of lower prices attracted an increased "buying interest, which appears to 
have teen sustained. The reappearance of Japanese "bxiyers in the Australian 
market also has "been an important factor. There are indications that 
Japanese participation has stimulated British and continental iDuying in 
anticipation of higher raw wool values. In the United Kingdom raw wool 
supplies were increasing late in Decem"bGr, "but a rapid rate of consumption 
indicated that all availa'ble supplies would he needed. 

Values of cross"bred wools at the opening of the current London 
sales advanced furt"her with respect to the closing of the preceding sales 
than did merinos. Japan and the United States have "been the chief operators 
in finer ¥,evr Zealand cross"breds during recent weeks. Continental "buyers 
also have given the market good support. Shipments of wool from Bradford 
to the United States increased sharply late in Decem"ber. 

The upward tendency of recent weeks in raw wool prices has "been 
reflected in higher quotations on British semi-manuf actu-^es and finished 
cloth. A sellers' market has prevailed in all stages of \:he industry with 
each handler in a position to quote future "business on tV^e "basis of the 
cost of his raw ma,terial. Spinners have "been v;ell placed in this respect, 
with a considerable amount of new "business on hand at attractive terms. 
Practically all qualities of yarn have a.dvanced in price. Business in 
piece goods also has "been active. The adva^nce in cloth prices has had 
no appreciable effect on the volune of current orders, since buyers have 
been noting the strength of the position of raw wool and semi-manufactures. 
Men's suitings in both worsted and woolens are in active request, and there 
is a good call for tweeds, flannels, and gaberdines for the spring season. 
ViTorsteds for women's wear are also in better demejid than form.erly. C-ood 
support is being given by the export markets; and orders from British 
Dominions, the United States, and some European, countries are up to a 
reasonably high standard. 



milTED STATES AaRICLTLTURAL EXPfiRTS DURING- NOTEIfflER 

The seasonally adjusted index of the volume of United States agri- 
cultural exports for November stood at 59 percent of the pre-war average. 
This compares with 98 percent in November 1935 and 56 percent in November 
following the drought of 1934. The low level may be attributed princi- 
pally to reduced supplies resulting from the drought of the past summer. 
Some of the reduction, however, particularly of fruit exports, has doubtless 
resixlted from widespread labor disputes in the maritime industries. 



32 



To reign Crops end Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 3 



The NovemlDer index for cotton export quantity was 65. This com- 
pared with 107 in November 1935 and 53 ' in Novemher 1934. The index for 
unmanufactured tohacco amounted to 125. This was less than the unusually 
heavy exports in Novemher 1935, when the index was 171, "but compared favorat)ly 
with the Novemher indexes of 1932 to 1934. The index for fruits dropped 
to 93. Grains, with an index of 13, reached a new low record. Exports 
of cured pork and lard compeared fairly vrell with other recent months 
and with the same month a. year earlier. 

From July 1 to Novemher 31, 1936, total exports of farm products 
were valued at $343,968,000. This represented a decrease of 9 percent 
in comparison with the same 5 months of 1935 when the export value stood 
at $379,355,000. The volume index for the July-Novemher period was 55 
percent of the pre-war level as against 64 last season, representing a 
decline of 14 percent. 

In the 5 months ended Novemher 30, foreign markets ahsorhed 
2,574,000 "bales of united States cotton, valued at $163,556,000. In the 
same period of 1935, cotton exports ajno\mted to 3,014,000 Dales valued 
at $185,628,000, a decrease of 15 percent in vol^jme and 12 percent in value. 
Continuing the upward trend which set in ahout a year ago, exports of 
lard rose from 20,498,000 pounds in 1935 to 41,399,000 pounds in the 
July-Novemoer period of 1936. There was also a somewhat la.rger movement 
of canned "beef and sausage, pickled "beef, arA pork. 

Fresh pears, wit'n an export of 111,164,000 pounds, were the only 
fruit showing a gain over the same months of last season. In July-Novemher 
1935, exports of fresh pears amounted to 97,874,000 pouJids. Total ex- 
ports of leaf tohacco dropped to 202,545,000 pounds as against 213,519,000 
poijjids in 1935 with a corresponding reduction in value. Shipments of flue- 
cured leaf to the United Kingdom have "been r~uaning under those of last 
season . 



UNITED STATES: Iiidex numhers of the volume of agricultural exports, 

adjusted for seasonal variation, Novem"bcr 1936, with comparisons, 
(July 1909 - June 1914 = 100) 



Commodity or commodity group 



1934 


1935 


1936 


Nov . 


Nov . 


Sept . 


Oct. : 


Nov. 


56 


98 


63 


74 


59 


53 


68 


44 


53 


38 


53 


107 


79 


81 


65 


120 


171 


134 


154 


125 


103 


322 


327 


211 


93 


20 


17 


19 


22 


13 




27 


19 


21 


; 13 


29 


19 


10 


9 


; 17 


59 


24 


22 


30 


' 28 



All commodities . 

All commodities, except cotton. 
Cotton fi"ber, including linters 
To"bacco, unmanufactured a/ 

Emits 

TJheat, including flour ... 
Grains and grain products 

Cured pork h/ 

Lard, excluding neutral . . 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Eoreign and Domestic 
Commerce. Eor detailed figures on exports, see page 33. a/ Includes 
stems, trimmings, etc. h/ Includes hacon, hams, 'shoulders, and sides. 



January 18, 1937 



Foreign Crops and luarkets 



33 



Ui\"ITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 
July-Novemter , 19o5 a.nd 1936 





• 




July -November 




Commodity exported 


; Unit 


1 Quantity 


Value 


' 


: 1935 


1936 


: 1935 


1936 


ANIiViALS Ai-iD Ailliv'iAL PRODUCTS: 


: 






: 1,000 


1,000 


Animals, live: 


; 


Thouse.nds 


•Thousands 


; dollars 


dollars 






■ .1 . 


: 2 


; 106 


; . 105 






a/ .. 
■3 


i a/. 


: . . . 4 


: 3 






; . . . 2 


. 439 


358 


Mules, asses, and burros ..... 


, Ko . 


2 


: , , 1 


; . .352 


' 110 


Dairy products: 














: Lb. 


. 591-. 


: . .318 


133 


107 




.; Lb. 


458 ■ 


: 448 


101 


110 


Milk- 












Presh and sterilized 


.i Gal . 


35 


25 


20 


17 




i Lb. 


1,404 ■ 


571 


164 


67 




■ Lb. 


1 , 233 


• 1 , 635 


292 


341 




: Lb. 


10,299 


9 , 481 


- • 669 


716 


infants' foods, malted, etc. . 


: Lb. 


912 


: 1,135 


273 


340 




: Doz. 


o72 


625 


215 


186 


Meats and meat products: 


; 










Beef and veal- 








. . . 






Lb. 


2,122 


^1,627 ■ 


■ 375 


251 




.; Lb. 


2,680 


4,730 


274 


377 


Canned beef, incl. corned .. 


.j . . Lb . 


660 ■ 


77^^ 


222 


237 




.; Lb. 


5.462 ■ 


■ 7.131 


871 


865 


Pork- 














' Lb. 


43 


105 


8 


13 




Lb. 


1 ,707 , 


1 ,277 ■ 




225_ 




; Lb. , 


1 , 750 


1.382 


307 


238 


Bacon 


.; Lb. 


1,868 


2", 154 


.359 


358 




.; Lb. 


21 , 553 


18,016 


4,422 


3,892 


Sides, Cumber. & V/iltshire . . 


.: Lb. 


21-6 


254 


43 


37 


Pickled or salted 


.• Lb . • 


2,652 


5, 654 


377 


653 




Lb . . 


3 , 406 


3.178 


1.246 


1.079 . 


Total pork 


Lb. 


31,445 


30, 638 


6.754 


6.257 


Mutton and lamb 


.: Lb. 


207 


154 


37 


31 




Lb. 


797 


5 61 


177 


124 


Sausage- 


• 












.;• Lb. 


396 


479 


104 


133 




.: Lb. 


503 


482 


119 


103 ' 


Other meats- 












Tresh, frozen, or cured 


.; Lb. 


• 6,495 


8,559 


839 


1,099 


Canned, incl. canned 












.: Lb. 


4 61 


998 


1?,2 


174 . 


Total meats 


Lb. 


45,767 


49 , 002 


9 , 023 


R. 786.... 


Meat extracts and bouillon 










cubes 


,: Lb. 


55 


29 


80 


53 


Sausage casings 


.• Lb. 


12,290 


11,611 • 


2,587 


2,432 



Continued - 



34 



Foreign Croos and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 3 



UNITED STATES: 



Exports of principal agricultural products, 
July-Novem'ber , 1935 and 1936, cont'd 



COiYiriioc: ity exported 



Unit 



July- No V3 m"b e r 



'c^.-qp.ntity 



Value 



: 1935 


1936 


1935 


1956 






1,000 


1,000 


: Thousands 


Thousands 


, . dollars 


dollars 


: 20,49 8. 


41,399 


2,945 


4,912 


; . 234 


349, 


, . 36 


45 


; 4,154 


3,903 


508 


575 


i ^- > "^54 


1,847 


201 


170 


1 , 355 


1 . 244 


110 


98 


: 493 


791 


57 


51 


• , , , 6.,356.... 


3,624 


556 


269 


: 34.824 


53,157 


4.393 


5,918 


i ■ 3,014 


2,574 


165,628 


165,556 


: 125 


131 


2,909 


5,185 


; 665 


98 


1,414 


181 


: 2,859 


2,420 


4,369 


3,724 


I P '7 0' 
1 CO ( 




o, ujoy 


X , XCiCi 


I 18,465 


12,150 


1,523 


1 , 110 


i 19,560 




2,694 


2,651 


: 355 


217 


821 


557 


i 2,464 


1 , 245 


6,025 


3,821 


: 9 7,874 


111,164 


5,827 


3,989 


■ ITT PI 7 








: 68,769 


61,938 


5,172 


3,337 


; 182,598 


116,253 


15,446 


10,163 




T nf'ip 

X , KJ\J Cj 




1 78 

X 1 ^ 


i 10,527 


11,423 


1,057 


1,129 


i 5,082 


3,797 


2,724 


2,756 


i 


/ 

§:/ 


a/ 


d 


: 253 


301 


509 


339 


: 12 


17 


18 


22 


: 523 


377 


565 


614 


; 66,962 


7,557 


2,054 


263 


: 5 


1 


5 


1 


i 131 


1,683 


115 


1,651 


: 370 


502 


1,679 


2,294 


: 1,015 


1,096 


4.717 


5 . 453 


; 1,385 


1,598 


6,596 


7,747 


5,639 


9,194 


6,509 


9,378 



li'IIlviALS Aiu) ANIiviAL Pr^OD. , CONT 'D: ; 
Oils and fats, anirnal; ; 

Lard ■ Lh. 

Lard, ne^itral ; Lh. 

Oloo oil ; Lh. 

Oleo litock ; L"b. 

Stearins and fatty acids • Lh. 

Tallow : Lb. 

Other animal oils and fa,ts ; Lb. 

Tota.l oils and fats • Lb. 

VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: i 
.C otton ,uninfd. (Bales of 500 lb.) : 

Ra,w, except 1 inters : Bale 

L inters : Bale 

Eruits ; ; 
... Apples- ; 

Eresh ; Bskt, 

Eresh ; Box 

Eresh \ Bbl. 

Dried : Lb. 

Apricots, dried \ Lb. 

Gra.pe fruit : Box 

Oranges : Box 

Pears, fresh ; Lb. 

Prunes, drii d ; Lb. 

Raisins • Lb. 

Fru it, c anne d • Lb . 

Nut 3 ; \ 

Pucans j Lb. 

■Walnuts : Lb. 

Gra ins, fl o ur and meal : : 

Barley, exclr:.ding flour. ; Eu. 

Buckwhe£\t, excluding flour ; Bu. 

Corn, including cornmeal ; Bu. 

iviP-lt ; Bu. 

Oats , including oatmeal ; Bu. 

Rice, including flour, mea.l • 

and broken rice b/ \ Lb. 

Rye, excluding flour : Bu. 

Wxea.C , grain : Bu. 

Yfhea.t flour- ; 

¥nolly of U.S. wheat : Bbl. 

Other wheat flour \ Bbl. 

Total wiieat flour : Bbl. 

1/Vlieat including flour ' Bu. 



Continued - 



January' 18, 1937 

UNITED STaIES 



Poreign Crops end Markets 



35 



Exports of princ 
July-Novemb,;r , 



ipr.l agricult-aro.l products, 
1935 and 1935, cont'd 



Commodity e:rported 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D 
O ilseed products : 

Cottonseed c^.ke end raec^-l 

Linseed caJke and meal , . 

Cottonseed oil, crude .. 

Cottonseed oil, refined 

Sugar (2,000 Its.) 

Tobacco lea f; 

Bright flue-cured 

Burley 

Dark fired,:Ky. & Tenness( 

Dark Virginia 

Maryland and Ohio export 

Green River (Pryor) .... 

One- sucker leaf 

Cigar leaf 

Black fat, v/a.ter baler and 

de.rk African 

Perique 

Total leaf tobacco , . 
Tobacco steins, trimmings an 

scrap 

Vegetables ; 

Beans, dried 

Peas, dried 

Onions 



Potatoes, white 



Vegetables, canned 

Misc. vegetable products ; 

Drags, herbs, roots, etc 

Glucose 

Hops 

Starch, corn 

TOTMi PPJi^'CIPAL AGHICUL1UIIA.L 
PRODUCTS 



TOTiL AGPJCULTLHAL PRODUCTS 
TOTAL EXPORTS, ALL COivMODITIES 



J uly-Kov ember 



TTn i t 


Quantity 


Value 






"1 Q '■-^ 




X JO D 








1,000 


1 , 000 




• Thousands 


' Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


L. ton 


• ■ 5 


3 


125 


S3 


L. ton 


87 


69 


1,979 


2,048 


Lb. 


47 


36 


5 


4 


Lb. 


1,504 


950 


178 


111 


Ton 


64 


32 


2,900 


1,381 


Lb, 


180 , ('o9 


1 fo , 915 


7 r , ^lo 


/4 , X o(J 


T >, 

LD, 


3,130 


4 , o41 


709 


1,003 


Lb. 


17,559 


11,965 


2,515 


1,562 


Lb. 


3,626 


5,598 


966 


859 


Lb. 


1,766 


1,824 


527 


367 


Lb . 


756 


1,339 


69 


118 


Lb. 


0 DO 


O (O 


1 D 




T n 


320 


250 


195 


144 


Lb. 


4,705 


4,478 


786 


779 


Lb. 


^.^ 




6, 


19 


Lb. 


.213.519 


202.545 


83,757 


79,151 


Lb. 


4,852 


9,035 


98 


250 


Lb. 


3,170 


2,076 


124 


85 


Lb. ; 


1 , 200 


2,889 . 


54 


94 


Lb. j 


■ 20,522 


26,336 ■ 


388 


402 


Lb. ' 


83,238 


53,194 


857 


958 


Lb. 


17,515 


15,975 : 


1,772 . 


1,506 


Lb. 


2,284 


2,290 


525 


984 


Lb. 


9, 635 


11,852 


263 


350 


Lb. 


2,255 


535 ' 


351 


232 


Lb. ^ 


ia^559 


14,319 ' 


538 


501 








350,658 '. 


324.239 








379,355 


343,968 



i,a9,030 1,054,867 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Less than 500. 

by Includes paddy in twrms of cleaned. 



36 


Foreign Crops 


and Markets Vol. 34, No. 


3 


Ui^Jiiiijjj oiAj-iijb: iijxporu 


quantity of 


specified 


agricultural products, 




1S35 and 1936, and Hovein"ber, 1935 


and 1935 






• 


January- 


November 


November 




; Unit 














1935 


1935 


1935 


1935 


EXPORTS DOiviESTT 0' 


I 




Tlinuspnds 


Thousands 


Thousands 


"Rp r*on 


' T.'h 


5 590 


3, 868 


207 


270 






52,178 


' 40,055 


4 754 


4 04? 






38,501 


101,908 




9 563 


frTAins PTid *n T* fin P TP "h i n 71 • 


! 










Barley 




6 Ph"? 


7 361 


371 

O 1 X 


196 


Corn « • 


I "Rn 






q 


R 


Rice- 














' T"h 




X O , C)0^ 


34 1 59 


5 1 51 

y X.4-y X 


iri mi "P iTiP P 1 p "h r* 


' T "h 




RP 


4. 


4 


VlThfip t— 












rj-TPT Ti 


■ ' "Rtt 




1 

X , oci3 


ou 
















T T"n I't'PrI Q't"Q"f"oc2 inr n o o "1" 
\Jil X 0 G U_ O V c^- 0 C o W iicci 0 




O (O 




59 


50 




; 










© sil— 
















IP) n 






X , U f o 


"PP ^3 Q 


T n 


Tin ^nQ 


1 PR 1 7R 


18 , 241 


14 ,452 


OT'rtTI c*P Q 


' T3 <^-<'- 


O , cXJX. . 


• o , y o<o 


173 


188 




■ Box 


957 


323 


41 


57 


Dried- 
















29,557 . 


21,095 L 


10 , 116 


1 ,741 






24,592 


25 , 424 


3,218 


552 


"P T^i 1 Tl P c; 


: Lb 


1 72 210 


153 238 


64,524 


6,383 






98,957 


91., 532 


28,857 


5,810 






72,437 


56,742 


9 , 255 


358 


Tobacco leaf: 
















255,512 


281, 551 


55,490 


40,292 


Da.rk-iirecL Kentucky 
















50,772 


47,530 


6,016 


2,719 






36,545 


38,631 


2,511 


3,721 






342,429 


357, 812 


54,117 


45, 732 


Cotton, excl. linters 
















4,974 


4,315 


1,135 


590 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of ioreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Includes Cumberlajid and Wiltshire sides, 
b/ Includes paddy in terms of cleaned. 



Jsjiuary 18, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



37 



TOUTED STATES: 



Imports (for 
Jul 



consunpticn) of principal agriculture?,! products 
y-HovemDer, 1935 r?iid 1936 



Commodity imported 

~ COMPETITIVE 
ANIMALS Airo ANIlvLAL PRODUCTS: 
A nimals, live ; 

Cattle 

Hogs (except for breeding 

Horses 

Dairy products ; 

Sutte r 

Casein 

Cheese- 

Swi s s 

Cheddar 

Other 

Total cheese 

Cream 

Milk- 
Condensed and evaporated 

Dried and malted 

Whole, sk. and buttermilk 
Eggs and egg products 



Unit 



July--N 0 V e m b e r 



Quantity 



Value 





; 193 5 


; 1936 


' 1935 


1936 














' Thousands 


• Thousands 


dollars 


' dollars 


No. 


120 


: 113 


2,745 


2,763 


Lb. 


2,380 


• 7,070 


223 


575 


No. 


3 


5 


392 


755 


Lb. 


834 


4 , 039 


143 


878 


Lb. 


637 


; 6,149 


44 


556 


Lb . 


2 616 


3, 654 


712 


1,023 


Lb. 


a/ 


6,044 


a/ 


'893 


Lb. 


19 .390 


19.570 


4.481 


4,089 


Lb. . 


22,006 


29,268 


5,193 


6,005 


Gal. 


^/ 


30 




45 


Lb. 


255 


1,267 


9 


57 


Lb. 


933 


9,343 


57 


478 


C-al. 


9 


30 


2 


7 


Loz. 


115 


155 


21 


23 


J.'h 
Jj u « 


O f o 


X y iC r 




47Q 


Lb. . 


1,891 


2 , 321 


262 


325 


Lb. . 


557 


606 


79 


109 


Lb. ; 


139,811 


c/ 


20,821 


20,076 


Lb, 


3,423 


1,430 


219 


124 


Lb. : 


636 


938 


41 


77 


Lb. i 


18 


9 


2 


1 


Lb. : 


2,260 


5,397 


309 


716 


Lb. i 


3,230 


11, 546 


725 


3,114 


Lb. : 


696 


1,140 


176 


290 


Lb. : 


314 


747 


95 


172 


Lb . ; 


30 , 901 


*7 C >~7'7 

35 , 533 


o on T 




Lb. : 


258 


44 


32 


13 


Lb. ; 


31,159 


35,577 


2 , 325 


3,314 


Lb. : 


323 : 


174 


41 


34 


Lb. : 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Lb. ; 


42,059 


56.958 


3,933 


7,842 


Lb. ; 


4,868 : 


5,995 


2,490 


2,576 


Lb. i 


89,201 ; 


43 , 320 - 


5,090 


2,080 


Lb. . 


24,567 


40,464- 


4,500 


9,755 



Eggs, in the shell 
Egg albumen, dried 

Yolks, dried 

Other egg products 

Hides and skins 

Meats and meat product s : 
Beef and veal- 
Fresh 

Pickled or cured. . . . 
Mutton and lamb, fresh 



Fresh , 

Hains, shoulders and bacon, 
Pickled, salted and other. 

Poultry and game 

Meats, canned- 
Beef, including corned..., 

Other canned 

Total canned 

Other moats- 
Fresh 

Prepared or preserved 

Total meats 

Sausage casings 

Tallov/ 

Wool, ijTimf d. , except free 
in bond , 



Continued - 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 3 

Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural products, 
July-'Movsmber, 1935 and 1936, cont'd 



J u ly- No V em b e r 



Commodity imported 


: Unit 


: Ou 


entity 


: Va 


lue 




. 


: 19 35 


: 1936 


: 1935 


; 1936 


1/ Umr ±j T 1 i I V i , CON T ' D 








: 1,000 


; 1 , 000 


viLLrJljliLDlib rJiOlJ'JCiS ; 




ixhousaJids 


: Thousands 


! dollars 


; dollars 


Got lee imported into P.R 


; Lb. 


i 150 


: ■ 0 ■ 


: 


; 0 


Cotton, unmfd. ('478 ITi. h^ln) 


I 












: Bale 


; ■ 38 


: 64 


: 2 , 543 


: 4,148 




: Bale 


a/ 


i 27 


: 


: 510 


ieeds and fodders: 


• 










-beet pulp, dried (2,240 lb.). 


: Ton 


9 


; 17 


: 189 


; 449 


Bran, shorts, etc- 


; 










Of direct import (2,240 lb.) 


I Ton 


104 


; 138 


; 1,964 


; 3,370 


Witndrawn bonded mills 


; Ton 


30 


: 38 


! 555 


; 766 


Total bran, shorts, etc." 


: Ton 


134 


176 


2 , 519 


4,136 


Hay (2,000 pound) 


' Ton 


1 


50 


11 


358 


Oil cake and oil-cake meal- 


'• 












\ Lb. 


' 8 , 539 


11,390 


85 


164 




j Lb. 


54,958 


24,336 


461 


203 




j Lb. 


2, 779 


18,132 


25 


191 


T 2. -\ 


: Lb. 


5,611 


21,908 


49 


219 


ATT « XT 


: Lb. 


' 1.208 


5, 161 


11 


56 


Total oil cake and meal... 


■ Lb. 


73.095 


80.927 


631 


833 


Fruits: 














: Lb. ; 


3,581 


5,803 


228 


390 




: Lb. 


4,941 


5,005 


265 


276 


"r\ _ 4- _ 


: Lb. 


' 40,089 


39 , 129 


1,401 


1,434 


Tn • 


'Lb. ■ 


5, 106 


4,978 


336 . 


334 


/^^ 


'Cu.ft. : 


8 


4 


13 . 


11 


T 


' Lb. I 


4 


564 


b/ ; 


17 




Lb. ; 


4, 378 


5,451 


112 


145 


Pineapples- 






£/ 










c/ 


59 ; 


141 




Lb. ' 


2,361 . 


6,948 


115 


341 


Product of the P.I 


Lb. ; 


1,939 . 


8,156 


97 : 


341 




Lb. i 


667 ■ 


405 '. 


67 : 


30 




Gal . ;' 


2,220 


2,470 . 


1,184 ; 


1 , 523 


Grains and srain products: 












*n ^ T _ 


Bu. j 


406 


6,735 : 


300 ; 


5 , 658 




Lb. ; 


132 , 59 1 : 


140,666 ; 


3 , 573 ; 


3,413 




Bu. ; 








11 , r D'i 




Bu. '; 


44 : 


84 : 


19 i 


28 


Rice- 














Lb. j 


974 ; 


1,267 : 


32 ; 


37 




Lb. ; 


2,184 


3,626 : 


■ 64 : 


92 




Lb. ; 


758 : 


591 ; 


30 : 


20 




Lb. : 


5,211 ;. 


44,425 : 


84 : 


743 




Bu. ■ 


2,091 : 


3,709 ' 


983 ■ 


2,395 



38 

mi I TED STATES: 



Continued - 



Januaiy 18, 1937 Foreign Crops alid Markets 39 



UrIiTED STATES: Imports (for constimption) of principal -^.gri cultural products, 

July-ITovem'bcr, 1935 and 1936, cont'd 









July-i> 


"■ov ember 




I, ^^^^ TTi rl 1 "f" "kt" i ttti", t* "h o ri 


; Tin i f 


; Qupjitity 


; Value 




: 1935 


■ 1936 


• 1935 


1936 


\j\jW^± il) 1 1 ± 1 V JIj . UUi» 1 JJ 


— T 

i 






* T r\r\i'\ 
; 1,000 


; 1,000 


VEGETABLE PRODJCTS, COi)JT'D: 




; Thousands 


; Thousands 


\ dollars 


; dollars 


Grains a.nd gra.in prod.,, cont'd: 












TJheat, grain- 


I 












• Bu. 


• ■ 12 , 157 


; 19,114 


; 10,364 


• 18,482 


jjutiaDie at lu^o act vai. <!/.■. 


! ±iu. 


; 4', 522 ■ 


: 3,652 


; 2 , 995 


: 2,925 


Millea m oond for export- 


; 














1, 552 


: 1 , 427 


: 1,370 


; 1,337 


To otner couritries 


• .dU. 


6'. 359 










. ±)U. 


<£l , 590 


O O COT 

"oo , 5c;l 


1 / , o\i-^ 


; idc , r (do 




' Tl'K 1 


9 


2o 




' 00 






21 , 632 


28 , 631 


1 / , 434 


. do , oi<^ 










8 , 257 




Oils, vegetable; 












O /~1 V~ T T 4" /-> A 1 


' T "K 


131-, 70o 


120 ,017 


5, lib 


4 , o70 




' T "U 


11-, 059 


11,824 


685 


813 




' T V 


53 , 379 


42 , 152 


3 , loO 


2,421 




' T 


508 


19 


22 


10 




' T 


30 , 710 


24 ,075 


3 ,788 


2 , 976 




• T >! 


25, 354 


14,239 


1 , 695 


1 , 103 




! T 


22 , 990 


9 , 916 


949 


461 




; Lo . 


126 , 359 


139 , 211 


3 , 982 


4, 584 




' T "U 

; LD . 


20 , 172 


5,816 


918 


359 




' T "K 


29 , 846 


36 , 733 


1 , 783 








6 , 584 


3 , 205 


■1 ,408 


1 , Ol3 


^ r r\ (Ti «^ "v^ ^ "1 ( 


' T "K 


C TOO 

0, 128 


1 ,128 


..d34 


5y 




■ T "K 


8 , 049 


11,484 


500 


'7 /^ 

730 




I T >, 






r , duo 


0 , Ob <C 














C]f^ Q "h ri T* "h P n 'i" Q 


1 T,"h 


fty , Ucb 


Do ,0o5 


1 , Ico 


1 , (CUl 


rinTi T*Pi 


' T.Ti 


<ooX , V LU 


loo ,o±r 


0 , U'yrl 


•3,1 o<C 




' Tl--. 


c on " 

o ,c ro 


/ , UOo 


0 , 4tl U 


y , cOb 


"P PI 1 m Tl~\^ "h. Q q "r. Ir r ^ -rn o 1 o 


• J.'n 


n Ol end 

iO , b 


no o '~7 '~i 

lb , 837 


<:U / 


oyo 




• T,n 


O, rbo 


T-cr Ado 


1 r 0 


ouy 


S\ £5 L J O O O ^'f'\ T 1 f^i 








1 , 54o 


0 00c 
d , y<ob 




; 












rnr\r-i 




O DO 










67,969 


120,38 5 


4,690 


6,372 


To"bacco. ■oxiiiipr'Lrf ?^r* til rpf^ • 












Leaf 


: Lb. 


25,918 


26,085 


12,104 , 


13,922 


Product of the P.I 


; LI). : 


1,004 


886 : 


93 . 


77 




1 Lt. 


835 


760 : 


30 ! 


28 


Vegetatlos : 












Beans- 














; LiD. : 


9,282 


11,979 ; 


240 \ 


367 




• L"b. 


508 


561 ■ 


15 


16 



Continui^d - 



40 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, l.;o. 3 



UNITED STATES: 



Imports (for consiiraption) of principal agricultural products, 
July-November, 1935 and 1936, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



Unit 



July-Noveml3er 



Quantity 



Value 





1 Q 'Z R 


Xf oc 




X^ O D 


; 






1,000 


1,000 


I 


Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


; Ld . 


4, ivy 


A m Q 

4 , r iy 


XOD 


XOU 


; Ld. 


2 , 155 


1 , 374 


1 A ^ 


DO 


; L"b. 


2 , 408 


1 , 205 




P':» 


: U). 


1,845 


597 


59 


17 


I Lb. 


1 


3 






; Lb. 


4 , 030 


26, 575 


42 




• Lb. 


827 


3,192 


13 


59 


i Lb. 


83,183 


111,367 


1,781 


2 , 228 


: Lb. 


255 


1,870 


4 


32 


i Lb. 


42,084 


58,880 


225 


407 


. Lb . 


T r T n /I 
3d , 114 




X , o^x 


1 PQ7 


; Ton 


2 


2 


889 


601 




b/ 


D/ 


XUU 


O 1=, 
.J o 


; Ton 

; 




1 7 


1 , 532 


1 , 236 










; 

; Lb. 


20,711 


28,707 


45,298 


' 46,367 


, LD. 






XX , CO'-k 


1 1 PPd- 


1 

•Bunch 


23 , 176 


26 , 162 


11 , 62o 


X2 , dU4 


Lb. 


727,323 


593,064 


51,370 


45,503 


■; Lb. 


203,396 


228, 681 


8,769 


12,145 


j Lb. 


38,000 


36,781 


7,072 


7,560 




44,617 


c/ 


3,458 


2,934 




37 , 651 


63,273 


3,787 


5,290 


\ 


3 


6 


663 


1,534 




19 


11 


1,602 


1,638 




68 


46 


4,836 


5,208 


: Lb. 


,421,407 


474.431 


47.245 


72.352 






197,009 


224,259 








224.967 


253.861 








421.976 


478.120 








463,929 


541,316 








874, 794 


1,028,615 



COMPETITIVE. CONT'D 
VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: 
Veg:etables, cont'd . 

Chickpeas or garbanzos, dried 

Garlic 

Onions 



Dried 

Green 

Potatoes, vriiite 

Tapioca- 
Crude 

riour and prepared 

Tomatoes, fresh 

Turnips 

Vegetables, canned 

Fibers, ve^'etab le : (2,240 lb. ton) 

Elax, unmajiuf actured 

Hemp, unmanufactured 

Jute and jute butts, unmfd. . 
Total principal competitive 

agricultural products 

NON-COL'IPETITIYE 
ANIMAL PRODUCTS: 

Silk, raw 

?7ool, unmfd., free in bond.... 
VEGETABLE PHODUCTS: 

Bananas 

Coffee, ex. into Puerto Rico.. 

Cocoa or cacao beans 

Tea 

Drugs, herbs, roots, etc 

Spices 



Kapok 

Manila 

Sisal and henequen 

Habber, crude, incl. guayule . . . 
Total principal a.gricultural- 

Non-compctitivo products 

Competitive products 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL AGRI . PROD. 

TOTAL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 

TOTAL IMPORTS, ALL COMMODITIES. 



Compiled from official records oi the Bureau oi i'oreign ana uomesxic 
a/ Not separately classified prior to January 1, 1936. b/ Less than 
c/ Reported in value only. d/ Unfit for human consumption. 



Qcrcc . 



500. 



January 18, 1937 Foroigi: Crops and Markets 41 

OTITED STATES: Import quantity of specified agricultural products, 
Jarjoa.ry-NovernlDer, 1935 and 1936, and NovemlDer, 1935 and 1935 





i Unit ' 


January- 


-November 


November 


Commodity 


1 ; 










1 .' 


1935 


1935 


1935 


1935 






Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousejids 


I1\£P0RTS i^CR COSSUlvIPTION: 


\ : 














351 


398 


39 


15 


Beef, canned, 














, . : Lb . 


69,395 


85,956 


6,811 


3,658 






22,334 


8,719 


277 


1,361 






45,911 


53,620 


5,880 


5,881 


Egg products, excluding 
















'y no 1 
( , UJl 


< , CUti 


613 


726 


Tallow 




236,525 


77,799 


13,475 


317 






40,598 


109,069 


7,422 


11,870 


Grains: 
















23,118 


36,284 


4,348 


3,199 






41,150 


27,041 


1,651 


5, 263 






10,099 


129 


2 


47 






9 , 641 


3,862 


1 


880 






304,920 


262, 761 


18,916 


28 , 715 






15,670 


13,876 


1,254 


2,707 






. 408,387 


355,412 


64,038 


10 , 170 


7 Yegeta,ble oilsj 
















! 308,283 


292,879 


21,985 


32 , 713 






' 263,047 


305,038 


26,370 


30,355 






' 109,077 


126,547 


7,683 


6* 609 






: 69,578 


117,903 


2,503 


0 


Siigar, rav/ (2^000 povmds) . . 


. . : Ton 


: 2,911 


2,821 


62 


; 114 






i 237,933 
\ 1 — i 


230,071 

. ,, .... , . 


7,792 


; 23,264 



Compiled from official records of the Bm"eau of Toreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Excludes v;ool imported free in bond for use in carpets, etc. 
b/ Includes only wheat full duty paid and 10 percent ad valorem. 



42 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 3 



FSMCE: Area sown to winter grains "by January 1, 1932-1937 



January 1 


Wint er 
wheat 


Winter 
rye 


Winter 
"barley 


Winter 
oats 




1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 


12,894 
12,853 
12,770 
13,007 
12,536 
12,772 


1,791 
1,859 
1,559 . 
1, 607 
1,611 
1,620 


432 
412 
494 
449 
452 
430 


2,204 
2,156 
2,022 
2,138 
2,114 
2,118 



International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 



CZECHOSLOVAKIA: Area sown to winter wheat and rye, 1932-1937 



Harvest year 


Winter wheat 


Winter rye 




1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1932 


1,997 


2,525 


1933 


2,150 


2,539 


1934 


2,099 


2,458 


1935 


2,250 


2,464 


1936 


2,217 


2,483 


1937 


1,969 


2,447 


International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 




CZECHOSLOVAKIA 


: Production of specified 


crops, 1932-1935 



Harvest year 


Potatoes 


Sugar "beets 


To"bacco 




1,000 "bushels 


1,000 short tons 


1,000 pounds 


1932 


340 , 843 


4,367 


37, 623 


1933 


301,373 


3,212 


25,965 


1934 


351,757 


4,575 


30,165 


1935 


282,094 


4,026 


27,812 


1935 


393,227 


4,459 


37,478 



International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 



January 18, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



43 



CO'TTOK; Price per pound of representative ravj cotton at Liverpool, 

January 7, 1937, vrith comparisons 



1936 ,1937 



Grovrth 


November' 


: December 


J.an. 


20 


; 27 


: 4 


11 


18 


. 24 


31 






Cen.ts 


•Cents 


Cents 


C ent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


American - 


















Middling 


13.77 


'13.71 


"13.91 


14.15 


14.03 


14.35 


14.53 


14.55 


Low Middling 


12.39 


12. 32 


12.48' 


12.68 


12.60 


12.87 


13. 56 


13.07 


Egyptian (Pully good fair) 


















Sakellaridis 


23.00 


23.36 


22.05 


21.91 


21.05 


'20.86 


21.28 


20.97 




15.20 


15.06 


15.25 


15.44 


15.47 


15.70 


16.02 


16.14 


Brazilian (I'air) - 




















12.90 


12,83 


12.99 


13.19 


13.11 


13.32 


13. 51 


13.48 




13.41 


13.34 


13.50 


13.70 


13.63 


13.84 


14.02 


14.00 


East Indian - 


Broach (Fully good) 


11 .12 


11.08 


11.19 


11.36 


11.19 


11.32 


11.75 


11.74 


C. P. Oomra No. 1, Superfine 


11.51 


11.47 


11.58 


11.74 


11.53 


11.71 


12.13 


12.13 


Sind (F-ally good) 


9.6S' 


9.63 


9.74 


9.91 


9.94 


9 .95 






Peruvian (Good) 


















Tanguis • 


17 . 07 


17 . 02 ■ 


17.17 


17.38 


17.82 


17.89 







Converted at current exchange rate. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and 
London, January 14, 1937, with comparisons 



Market and description 



1937 



Janurtry 7 



Jan.uary 14 



1936 
January 16 



New York, 92 score 

San Francisco, 92 score 

Copenhagen, official quotation 
London : 

Danish 

New Zealand 

Dutch 



Siberian . 



Cent s 

35.5 
34.0 
18.4 

24.1 
21.6 
21.4 
21.1 



Cen ts 

34.5 
34.0 
18.7 

24.2 
21.0 
21.4 
20.6 



Cent s 

32,5 
35.0 
20.1 

25. 6 
20.4 
22.0 

a/ 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange, 
a/ Quotation not available. 



44 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 3 



BUTTER; I^ew Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to January 1, 



with comparisons 



Date 


: 1934-35 


; 1935-36 


i 1935-37 




■ 1,000 poionds 


; 1,000 pQ-unds 


• 1,000 T:ounds 


ITeek ended 








August 1 to October 30 


: 79,868 


; 76,412 


: 79,257 


November 6 


10,192 


: 10 , 243 


; 10,350 


13 


: 10 , 415 


i 10,136 


; 11 , 200 


20 


i 10,416 


i 10 , 472 


; 10,920 


27 


; 10 , 803 


; 10,360 


; 10,975 


November total 


' 41,832 


; 41,216 


: 43,455 


December 4 


; 10,192 


: 10,696 


: 10,696 


11 


: 9,968 


: 10,695 


: 11,032 


18 


; 9,600 


: 10,080 


; 10,730 


25 


: 8 , 904 


; 10,192 


: 7,163 


December total 


: 38,864 


; 41 , 664 


; 39,625 


January 1 


: 8 . 400 


; 10,416 


•: 12 , 203 


Total An^st 1 to January 1. . 


j 168,964 


\ 169 , 703 


i 174,547 


Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London. 






BUTTER: Australian grading, 1936-37 season to December 12, 




with comparisons 




Date i 


1934-35 ; 


1935-36 : 


1936-37 




1 , 000 pounds ; 


1,000 pounds ; 


1,000 pounds 


Week ended : 








July 1 to September 26 1 


30,868 : 


24,179 ; 


20,057 


October 3 ; 


5,784 ; 


4,771 ; 


3,721 


10 ; 


6 , 500 I 


5,383 : 


4,059 


17 ; 


6,516 ; 


6 , 704 ; 


4,731 


24 i 


7,302 ; 


7,155 ; 


4,525 


31 ; 


8,617 ; 


7 , 728 : 


4,988 


October total ': 


34,719 i 


31,741 ; 


22,024 


November 7 : 


8,590 i 


8,212 : 


4,997 


14 ; 


8,803 i 


8 , 631 i 


5,096 


21 ; 


7,526 i 


8,384 ; 


5,69 6 


28 ; 


10 , 022 ; 


8,086 : 


5,042 


November total i 


34,941 : 


33,313 : 


20,831 


December 5 ; 


8 , 570 ; 


7 , 249 : 


5,233 


12 ; 


9,914 : 


6 , 749 : 


4,944 


Total July 1 to December 12. . ; 


119,012 •; 


103,231 : 


73,099 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee. 



I 



January 18, 1937 



j!'o reign Crops and Markets 



45 



XHiiiMGij jiATES: Avora^ie weekly and monthly values in Hew York of 
s p e Q 1 f 1 e d oxr ren c ie s , J anua ry 9 , 19 37, v>rit h coap ari sons a/ 



Montia 



Country 


Monetary 


_193fi_ 


1935 . 




1936 




1935 


1937 


Unit 


Dec. 


Dec. ; 


Oct. 


Nov. ; 


Dec. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Jan, 














26 


2 


9 






Cents 


Cants Cents 


Cents : 


Gents 


Cents 


Cents 


Gents 


Argentine., . 


Pcper peso 


32, 95 


32.85| 


32.67 


32.58 


32.72 


32.74 


32. 75 


32. 7a 


Canada 


Dollar 


101.31 


99.05: 


100.02 


100.12! 


100.06 


100.08 


100 . 03 


100.01 


China 


Ghang. joian 


34.22 


23. 4S 


29.33 


29 . 47 


29 ..53 


29.42 


29. 62 


29.62 


Denma.rka . . . . 


Krone 


22.08 


22.00; 


21.8V 


21.83 


21.91 


21.92 


21.92 


21 . 93 


England 


pound 


494,58 


492.88; 


489. 8A 


488. 8Ci 


490. 78 


491.16 


491.15 


491.15 


Franc e 


Franc 


6. 60 


6,60; 


4.6? 


4.65: 


4.67 


4.67 


4.67 


4.67 


Germany 


Reichsinark 


40.19 


40.22; 


40.20 


40.22 


40.23 


40.23 


40,23 


40 . 23 


Italy 


Lira 


8.54 


8.08] 


5.53 


5.26; 


5.26 


5. 26 


5.26 


5.26 


Japan 


Ten, 


28.82 


23.74: 


28. 61 


26.561 


28.51 


28.58 


28.30 


23.45 


Mexico 


Peso 


27.76 


27.77 


27.75 


27.75; 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


Netherlfinds 


Guilder, . . . 


67. 64 


67.77 


53.63 


53.99; 


54.57 


54. 75 


54. 75 


54. 75 


Her way 


Krone 


24.85 


24. 76: 


24. 61 


24.56i 


24.66 


24.67 


24.67 


24. 68 


S^/eden. . . , . . 


Krona 


25,50 


25 . 41; 


25.52 


25.20 


25.30 


25.32 


25.32 


25.32 


Sv/itzerland 


Franc 


32.41 


32.43i 


22.99 


22.98 


22.98 


22.99 


22.98 


22.98 


Federal ile serve Board, a/ Noon ouying 


rates 


ior cabl 


e transfers. 







Week ended 



LIYoSSTOOK AIJD MEAT: Price, per 100 pounds in specified European 
Januai y 5 , 19 37, _J^_ ith com paris ons ay 



markets 



Ivls.rket and item 



GermcJLy: 

Price of nogs, Berlin 

Price of lard, tcs. , Hcialurg 

United Kingdom; b/ 

Prices at Liverpool first qu^vlity- 

Americaji green oellies 

Donnish Wiltshire sides 

Canadian green sides. 

American short cut green hams 

Aiv.erican refined lard. 



Weuk ended 



Jejiunxy 8, 


Deceiiiter 30, 


January 5 , 


1936 


1936 


1937 


Dollars 


Dollc-irs__ 


Dollars 


17.70 


17*70 


17.70 


13. 3b 


15.33 


15.67 


15.10 


18.20 


18.20 


18.84 


20.17 


20.17 


16.00 


17.87 


17.83 


19.39 


20.50 


20.50 


13.61 


15.79 


16.01 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted e.t current rate of exchange, b/ V/eek ended Friday, 



46 



Vol. 7)4,, No, 3 



INDEX 



Late cables 27 

Agricultxu'al exports, U. S. : ' 

Index numbers, ITovenber 1936 32 

Principal ccnmodities, 

IJovenber 1936 33 



AgricultLijral iuports, principal 

commodities, U. S. , ITov enter 1935. 37 

Barley (vifinter), area, 

li^ancG, 1932-1937 27,42 



Seef, inport duties, U. K. , 

Dec. 16, 1936 29 

But t er : ■ 

Gradin/js: 

Australia, Dec. 12, 1936 44 

New Zealand, Jan. 1, 1937 44 

prices, specified nai'ketn, 

Jan. 14, 1957 43 

Cotton: 

Area, Argentina, 1936,1937 28 

&inninj,'s, E^jypt, Dec. 31, 1935.... 28 

Prices, U. K., Jan. 7, 1937 43 

Excacmge rates, foreign, 

Jan. 9, 1337 45 



Page 

Oats (winter), area, France, 

1932-1937 27,42 

Pork, prices, foreif^jn narkets, 

Jan. 6, 1937 45 

potatoes production, 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1936 27,42 

Rye (rinter ) : ' 

Area: 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1937.. 27,42 

Prance, 1932-1937 27,42 

Sw^ar "beets, production, 

Czechoslovakia, 1932-1936 27,42 

Tobacco, production, 

Czechosiovak:ia, 1932-1936 27,42 

Vei^^etables (vi'inter), suo'oly, ^ 

U. S. , 1936-37 28 

Wheat (7\'inter): 

Area: 

Czecnoslovakia, 1932-1937.. 27,42 

Prance, 1932-1937 27,42 

Wool, sa,les: 

Australia (Brisbane), 

Jan. 11, 1937 ^ 

London, Jan. 12, 1937.. 27,^^0 



wj. ^ m ^ .i«e>' 



♦